Follow-up on application
 
, Posted on 07-Mar-2018


Follow-up on application

You’ve sent in your resume. Now what? Executive job seekers often struggle to know how to appropriately follow up with a potential employer after applying for an open position. Here’s some counselling on how you can follow up properly at each stage of the hiring process. Using these strategies, you can improve your standing as an applicant and increase your odds of landing your desired executive role. After application is first submitted As an individual who strives to lead in an executive capacity, there is always the inclination to dislike the loss of control. However, after you submit your application, the ball will be in the employer’s court. They might not even be reviewing applications for several weeks; or, the hiring managers might have hundreds to review. So this stage of the process is all about patience. Job seekers are frequently advised to call at this stage of the process to check on their status, or even more ambitiously, to try to schedule an interview. But most hiring managers don’t respond well to this tactic. It is typically viewed as overly aggressive and even annoying. After all, it is likely that dozens, if not hundreds, of applicants are applying this same tactic. When dealing with this in such large quantities, it’s no wonder why employers become annoyed by this.

Phone when following up about your job application.

The method for prospective candidates to stand out at this stage of the hiring process isn’t by having an overly aggressive approach. Rather, you’ll be able to stand out by being a highly qualified candidate, presenting a fantastic cover letter, as well as being responsive and considerate. If you feel compelled to reach out to particular hiring manager, it can be acceptable to follow up on one occasion. The key to this interaction is to be as unobtrusive as possible, while still underscoring your interest in the position. This is done not by calling, but by sending a quick email. The following can be used as a template: Good morning/afternoon, “I submitted my application for your __ position __ (timeframe, i.e. two weeks ago), and I just wanted to make sure my materials were received. I also would like to reiterate my interest in the position; I think it could be a great fit, and I’d love to talk with you about it when you’re ready to begin scheduling interviews.” Such a message highlights your interest in the position without interrupting the employer. It also doesn’t demand an immediate response, which demonstrates your poise and consideration of the situation. After an interview The rules change after an interview has taken place. At this stage in the proceedings, you have passed an initial screening. Further, both parties have both invested time in each other. At this juncture, you’re entitled to hear something back from the organization within a reasonable amount of time. Ideally, you would have ended the face-to-face interview by asking the employer on what their timeline appears to be for being in touch with the next steps. If you receive a timeframe and that time passes, then you have the perfect excuse to politely follow up. Do this by simply sending them a quick email; explain that you’re still very interested but understand that hiring can take time, and ask if they have an updated timetable.

If the organization cannot provide an approximate timetable during the interview, it is then appropriate to follow up within a week or two of your interview. Again, reinforce your interest and politely inquire as to what they expect their timeline for a decision to be. The main component of any follow-up you may notice is that you’re not just asking for an update on how things are going. That sort of inquiry is not as likely to produce useful information; it is also easier for employers to ignore, especially if the employer doesn’t have anything new to provide you. Instead, ask for some more specific, such as a timeline.

DR Jassim Haji


Related News

A New Approach to Peace
Apr 24

A New Approach to Peace

When the United Nations was created, its founders envisioned a different kind of world. A world in which disputes were resolved in meeting rooms and not battlefields. A world in which wars were stopped before they broke out. A world that didn’t wait for lives to be lost before springing into action. But...

Read More
Regional innovation systems: GCC as a learning region
Apr 22

Regional innovation systems: GCC as a learning region

The model of Silicon Valley is a source of inspiration to many countries since it created a nexus for generation of new ideas, funding, and patents. How can GCC learn from the research on innovation systems in UK, USA, Canada and EU? The following are a set of key lessons learned based on the global experience in...

Read More
Thiamine deficiency in pets
Apr 18

Thiamine deficiency in pets

Thiamine (vitamin B1) is a water-soluble vitamin and an essential dietary nutrient in dogs and cats. The brain and other high energy organs require thiamine for proper function because it is used for carbohydrate metabolism. Dogs and cats cannot synthesize thiamine, and therefore require thiamine as part of their...

Read More
Mobile Data on Moon surface
Apr 17

Mobile Data on Moon surface

Scientists teams up in Germany to bring mobile data roaming to the surface of the Moon – and the cost needn’t be astronomical! No need to worry about letting people know that you’ve arrived safely on the Moon – you’ll be able to check in on Facebook and send a selfie from the lunar...

Read More
Internal Security breaches
Apr 09

Internal Security breaches

Employee error is one of the main causes of internal IT security incidents which lead to the leakage of confidential corporate data, according to the findings of the Global Corporate IT Security Risks survey.  Although vulnerabilities in software used by company staff in their daily duties is one of the top...

Read More
Celebrating the joy of the written word
Apr 08

Celebrating the joy of the written word

In this day and age we encounter multiple forms of information feeders, quick images and capsules of messages and news fed to us constantly through so many channels. There is a global line of communication, which became our common and familiar mode of reception. We all have developed our favorite tool to access or...

Read More
Business recovery
Apr 03

Business recovery

The principle of Business Continuity (BC) has been created in order to ensure that business and operation would go on normally during any disaster.  And it is defined as the capability of the organization to continue delivery of products or services at acceptable predefined levels following a disruptive incident....

Read More
Ethics vs Work Ethics
Mar 28

Ethics vs Work Ethics

If your friend is working with you in the same organization, he might have called you one day and asked for a favor. “I will be late today, please punch my card for me”.  Many of us has encountered this situation one way or another, it may not be the exact same scenario but something very...

Read More
Entrepreneurship and Innovation: Necessary conditions
Mar 27

Entrepreneurship and Innovation: Necessary conditions

When the famous 14th century architect Sinan built the Blue Mosque in Turkey, did he have a business plan? This was the question asked by Omer Oz who was the first manager of technology incubation center in Turkey in the early 1990s.  The key message is that for an entrepreneur to succeed, he/she must have a good...

Read More
Executive leadership
Mar 26

Executive leadership

Demand for great executive leadership is always great. However, certain skills and attitudes will make the difference in how great leadership is defined. The following is a list of top skills and characteristics prospective executives will need to demonstrate in their CV and online profile to excel in the job...

Read More