Saudi women’s social enterprise protects Syrian refugees from hunger, thirst and loneliness

Saudi women’s social enterprise protects Syrian refugees from hunger, thirst and loneliness

“As you return home, to your home, think of others, do not forget the people of the camps,” said Mahmoud Darwish in one of his most wellknown poems, “Think of Others.” Darwish was regarded as the Palestinian national poet and lived between 1941 and 2008. Fatimah Al-Bassam, 26 and Nouf Aburas, 28 are two young Saudi women who were on a voluntary trip to Al-Azraq camp for Syrian refugees in Jordan when they decided to start a social business to offer a sustainable solution to help the refugees. “The idea began in October 2017.

We were in the camp on a trip organized by volunteering group and Care International,” Al-Bassam told Arab News. It all began with a question. “The group’s guide from the camp asked us about the most significant problem the people suffered from at the camp. The volunteers gave several answers like hunger, poverty, lack of health care, but the true answer actually was idleness,” she added. Al-Bassam said the refugees have been living in this situation for years. Their minimum needs, such as shelter, clothes, and food are usually met by relief organizations, but they have nothing to do but wait in their caravans or tents for time to pass.

The refugees are full of energy and enthusiasm but the opportunities are not there. “During the visit, I met a lady who told me that she graduated from a sewing course and has a certificate. She wants to practice her skill but she has nothing to do,” Al-Bassam said. “I was thinking, they have people who are good at sewing. They have sewing factories, but they do not have the opportunities to work, and that’s what they need, a sustainable solution.” Al-Bassam and Aburas joined in compassion for the refugees and co-founded the social development enterprise Jonnah store. In addition to her full-time job, Al-Bassam is a member of a volunteering group that organizes trips, many of which focus on the refugee crisis.

Aburas already has experience in a social enterprise to support women in Saudi Arabia. They collaborated with Care International in Jordan, one of the main humanitarian agencies in the camp. Jonnah store creates the right conditions to motivate the Syrian refugees to play an active role in alleviating the suffering of their society members, overcoming economic, social and cultural challenges, and enabling them to meet their primary needs of security, shelter, food, health and education. This happens by giving refugees the opportunity to practice their skills. It is a store that sells minimal wear made by people at the camp and designed by fashion designers from Saudi Arabia.

“Jonnah” in Arabic means the shield. According to Al-Bassam, their store’s name is borrowed from a Hadith by the Prophet Muhammad in which he said “Fasting is a shield,” because it shields the believer from himself, from his wrongdoings, and from behaving foolishly and impudently. “We want the Jonnah project to be the tool by which refugees protect themselves from hunger, thirst, and loneliness through the money they are making and the community that is being built,” said Al-Bassam. “I have a social business in Saudi Arabia.

I am interested in social issues, and poverty in particular,” Aburas told Arab News. She is the founder of Kurt, a social enterprise she founded in 2013 which supports local, disadvantaged women and teaches them tailoring so they can produce abayas as a sustainable means to fight poverty. “We did not want to go back home without doing anything. When we returned to Saudi Arabia we recognized that I had experience in a sewing and clothing business and Fatimah had experience in volunteering work and she had the contacts, so we founded Jonnah.” Al-Bassam and Aburas went to the camp in Jordan again in December 2017 to start the business. They started with six refugees working in the factory, and the number later increased to eight. And they are willing to increase the number of benefiting refugees as they grow their business.

It took them three months to produce the first collection. They faced some obstacles at the beginning, one being communication with the organization at the camp, which has many other priorities. “It’s hard sometimes, because they are a relief organization. They are not business oriented, so sending and receiving emails back takes some time,” said Al-Bassam. Moreover, achieving the desired product quality does not happen immediately. Aburas said that raising a social enterprise has the same challenges as any other enterprise: Following regulations in the country, keeping a consistent production line, and maintaining quality.

All of that needs continuous effort and faces some obstacles. “You want a bigger impact, but to make the impact you have to go through everything,” she said. However, there is an important difference between a social business and any other business. “You make more profit, not in order to make more money, but you make more profit to help more people so you have a bigger impact. More money is just the tool,” Aburas said. Sometimes people do not understand the concept of how social enterprises work. They may think that the refugee or the beneficiary receives 100 percent of the money they pay, but that is not how the business works.

Everything has a cost and the company needs the money to keep going and benefit more people. Jonnah Store goods are sold through Instagram, and they also participate in exhibitions. Al-Bassam and Aburas aspire to expand their project to reach more customers. They hope to launch their website, hire more refugees, collaborate with more designers, and cooperate with more companies in Saudi Arabia and in the world.




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